Here’s Looking at You, Selfie!

September 17, 2014 by

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By the time you read this column this story may have lost all its relevance. But as it has made a bit of a dust-up lately, I think it deserves some further treatment. This column may not sound like it has anything to do with libraries but hang in there. I’ll make the tie-in, not to everyone’s satisfaction of course, but at least I’ll make the effort.

About two weeks ago, the cyberverse was all a twitter about naked selfies, mainly of celebrities, that had been hacked right out of the cloud. Imagine that. What goes online isn’t exactly private. Doh!

Celebrities flew into high dungeon about this, and a few tech places wrote about the scumbags that hacked the cloud to get them. Some were aghast. How could this happen?! Some argued that the pictures were not of them. Most of the comments were along the lines that we all have an inalienable right to make naked photos of ourselves on our phones and store them online, only to be let out when we deem them relevant. And furthermore, how dare they? Taking something that isn’t theirs, yada, yada. It appears now that some of the more famous buff selfies will make their way to an art gallery. Lena Dunham, she of Girls fame and one who cannot seem to stay clothed under any circumstances for long, blamed it on everyone but those who had taken nude selfies.

Ah, the Internet.

First, raise your hand if you think that what goes on line is only a little less private than what you might post on the Times Square marquee. Seriously, can anyone today believe that even something “deleted” from the Internet is really gone? Unless you are the IRS, you can’t really delete anything off the web.

Secondly, naked pictures on your phones? Really, people. Isn’t that what mirrors are for? I know that narcissism is rampant and that the web has made all of us self-loving-loathing creatures. But honestly, why exactly do we need to be making picture of ourselves and of, well, you know. I think they’re called “privates” for a reason. Just saying.

Thirdly, yes, there are scumbags out there in every field and some of them work in Silicon Valley or Cupertino or some other tech-related field. As a group, tech folks have been criticized for 1) their les than upright and positive views of women (look at the gaming images of women, though women are nearly 50% of all gamers); 2) their unwelcoming attitude to members of the opposite sex (i.e., women need not apply ) and 3) their lack of restraint about what the web can display, show or otherwise unleash (just start typing into Google….). Anything goes is, I believe, the view, and information-wants-to-be-free is the mantra.

Given all this, it should come as no surprise that this happened and some members of the rich and famous were made, for a moment or two, still very, very rich and only slightly chagrined. A good rule of thumb about the web is that you put nothing on it you wouldn’t want your mother to see. If you do, brace yourself as you may find that your Mom is a bit annoyed, not to mention embarrassed.

So what does this have to do with libraries? Only to show the stark contrast between one medium, the Internet which has no appreciation for your privacy, and the other that has protected it from the first day you checked out your first book. It’s odd, isn’t it, that we hear all sort of “stuff” about privacy and First Amendment rights only to watch the Internet make roadkill of both on the information superhighway? Furthermore, no one really seems to care, at least not the way they would have had another entity been so cavalier about both. Apparently we will put up with anything when it comes to the web. It treats us shabbily, embarrasses us, encourages us to embarrass ourselves, and then laughs when we come back for more. Or, maybe that’s just laughing all the way to bank. Meanwhile, it continues to contend insidiously that it has or will soon replace libraries.

No one wants to put the genie back in the bottle (though many of us may want to put clothes back on some of those selfies!). Still, is it too much to ask that our choice not be between having a convenient service and giving up our privacy? Probably not.

The story of the selfie is emblematic. On the one hand, social media encourages you to look within, navel-gazing (omphaloskepsis for the academic in you) ad infinitum. On the other hand, libraries services force you to view the larger world outside you. Remember, the web is not exactly looking out for your best interests because it believes you have no privacy anyway so get over it. Should, however, you want privacy, well then, get thee …

…to a library.

[A version of this post will appear in Against the Grain later this fall.]

New and Improved Laptops at Dacus Library!

September 17, 2014 by

Did you know that the Circulation Department at Dacus Library just replaced its old laptops with new ones? Well we did! The 20 old Dell laptops have been replaced with 26 new ones, 2 of which can be loaned out for 7 days, like our iPads; the other 24 can be checked out for the normal 3 hour library use only loan period. The new laptops not only allow you to access your Z-Drive (from an icon on the desktop), but they also allow you to connect to the printers in the library (if you’re in the library) by prompting you to enter your ACC account username and password. It will deduct the print job from your print quota as normal.

laptop1 edited

Remember: If you save any work locally to the laptop itself, as soon as the laptop is shutdown or restarts, your work will be deleted and cannot be recovered, so make sure you are saving to external media such as a flash drive or your Z-Drive and save often!

For information on overdue charges, replacement charges and other policies regarding the laptops, please see the Circulation Department’s page on our website.

And let those of us at the Information Commons desk know how you like the new laptops – we love to receive input!

Fact or Fiction?

September 16, 2014 by

Fact or Fiction?

While streaking was an epidemic among college campuses throughout the United States in the early to mid 1970s, Winthrop was largely spared.

Streaking- March 5, 1974- Evening HeraldFalse:

In fact in March of 1974, several incidents of streaking were reported on Winthrop’s campus. These episodes coincided with Winthrop’s attempts to become a fully coeducational institution and some state legislatures attempted to use them to block Winthrop’s efforts. Fortunately for Winthrop the streaking craze subsided and the coeducational bill was passed later in the year.

Archives Collection Spotlight

September 16, 2014 by
Elizabeth "Lib" Mahon - ca1945

Elizabeth “Lib” Mahon – ca1945

ELIZABETH MAHON PAPERS, 1945-1999, nd (Accession 1215)

This collection includes an extensive amount of memorabilia pertaining to the All American Girls Baseball League (AAGPBL) and more specifically to Elizabeth “Lib” B. Mahon (1919-2001). Lib Mahon graduated from Winthrop College in 1942 and played in the AAGBL from 1944-1952 mostly with the South Bend Blue Sox. Lib was a great athlete and an all-star outfielder. She twice led the league in RBIs and once stole over 100 bases.

The Elizabeth Mahon Papers consists mostly of photographs trophies, newspaper clippings, a framed roster card, a videotape and memorabilia pertaining mostly to her playing career.

For more information about Lib Mahon, here is a link to an article by Jim Sargent. Also housed in the Winthrop Archives are the Jean Faut Papers who was a star pitcher, a four-time All-Star, and a two-time Player of the Year during her career in the AAGPBL. For more information about Jean Faut, here is a link to an article by Jim Sargent.

For more information about this collection please contact the Archives

Library Hours This Week

September 15, 2014 by

Dacus Library hours for the week of Monday, September 15th to Sunday, September 21st:

     Building Hours     Reference Hours
Mon. – Wed.      24 Hours
    9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
Thursday      24 Hours     9:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Friday      Closes at 7:00 PM     9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Saturday      12:00 PM to 7:00 PM     1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Sunday      Opens at 1:00 PM     1:00 PM to 9:00 PM

24 hour access to the library begins at 1:00 PM Sundays
and runs until 7:00 PM Fridays.
The Information Commons desk opens at 8:00 AM and closes at midnight during 24 hour access.
Only the main floor remains open after midnight.

View complete library schedule.

Don’t forget, you need a valid Winthrop ID card in order to access the library.

24 Hour Access at Dacus Library Resumes Sunday, September 14th!

September 12, 2014 by

Get excited! 24 hour access at Dacus Library is back as of Sunday, September 14th. We will open at 1:00 PM, as usual on Sunday, and remain open until 7:00 PM the following Friday.

During 24 hour access all services at the Information Commons desk will end at midnight and both the ground and second floors will be closed off at that time, but the main floor will remain open. Don’t forget you need to have a valid Winthrop ID card in order to access the building!

 

Does Dacus Library Have the Textbooks You Need?

September 11, 2014 by

The quick answer is: possibly. For the past couple of years, Dacus Library has received a small budget to be used for purchasing some of the textbooks most widely used by Winthrop students. Since we can’t purchase all required textbooks for all courses, we try to purchase textbooks for courses that have the highest enrollment to help out the most students. We currently have about 380 textbooks on reserve. We allow textbooks to be checked out for 3 hours, but keep in mind that they must stay in the building (library use only). If you’re short on time and just need to scan a few pages or a chapter, our three scanning stations on the backside of the Information Commons desk can be used; you can email or save your scans to a flashdrive for free or print your scans using your print quota.

To figure out if we have a textbook, go to the library homepage and click on the Reserves & Textbooks link located under the quick catalog search box (see image below). You must search for textbooks by course name (ex. HMXP 102), not professor name. If you only know the title of the textbook, instead of typing in the course name, type in “textbook” and you’ll get a list of everything on textbook reserve.

reserves

There are also course reserves which are materials (not necessarily textbooks) that your professor may have put on reserve for a specific course. You can check for these via the Reserves & Textbooks link either by course name or professor name.

If you still have questions, come to the Information Commons desk or contact us via chat, text, email or phone.

 

Why the Big Delay with 24 Hour Access at Dacus?

September 8, 2014 by

Many of you might be wondering what has happened to 24 hour access at Dacus Library. Why don’t we have it yet? Is it coming back? And if it is returning, when?

Well, the good news is that 24 hours/5 days a week will be returning. We don’t yet know when, but we hope to have it resume next week, if not before. The big delay has been because the security guard we had hired last year left. He did a great job and we wish him much luck in his future endeavors, but the simple fact is that without a security guard, we don’t have the staffing to remain open past midnight. Having a security guard not only allows the building to remain open past midnight, but allows for a safe environment in the building.

We know this has been confusing and frustrating for those who are used to Dacus being open 24 hours/5 days a week, but be assured that it has not been taken away, it has just been held up a bit by the interview and hiring process of security. We are working feverishly to get someone in place, so please bear with us just a little longer. And if you’re unsure of when we’re open and when we’re closed, check out our hours page here for all the details.

Library Hours This Week

September 8, 2014 by

Dacus Library hours for the week of Monday, September 8th to Sunday, September 14th:

Note: 24 hour access will resume this Sunday, September 14th.

     Building Hours     Reference Hours
Mon. – Wed.      8:00 AM to Midnight
    9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
Thursday      8:00 AM to Midnight     9:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Friday      8:00 AM to 7:00 PM     9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Saturday      12:00 PM to 7:00 PM     1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Sunday      Opens at 1:00 PM     1:00 PM to 9:00 PM

24 hour access to the library begins at 1:00 PM Sundays
and runs until 7:00 PM Fridays.
The Information Commons desk opens at 8:00 AM and closes at midnight during 24 hour access.
Only the main floor remains open after midnight.

View complete library schedule.

Don’t forget, you need a valid Winthrop ID card in order to access the library.

Library Hours This Week

September 1, 2014 by

Dacus Library hours for the week of Monday, September 1st to Sunday, September 7th:

Note: the library will be closed Monday in observance of the Labor Day Holiday.

     Building Hours     Reference Hours
Monday      Closed     Closed
Tues. – Wed.      8:00 AM to Midnight
    9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
Thursday      8:00 AM to Midnight     9:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Friday      8:00 AM to 7:00 PM     9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Saturday      12:00 PM to 7:00 PM     1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Sunday      1:00 PM to Midnight     1:00 PM to 9:00 PM

View complete library schedule.

Don’t forget, you need a valid Winthrop ID card in order to access the library.


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