Archives Collection Spotlight

April 14, 2015 by
Juanita Neely - 1947

Juanita Neely – 1947

JUANITA HENDERSON NEELY, 1911-1970, nd (Accession 6)

Juanita Henderson Neely was an extension agent and educator. She was born in Rock Hill, S.C. in 1889. She graduated with a B.A. from Winthrop College in 1911 and taught school from 1911 to 1918. She began working for the SC Extension Service, then based at Winthrop, in 1918 serving Lancaster County. She held various positions in the SC Extension Service in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. She became the State Home Demonstration Agent in 1947, a position she held until 1957. She was a member and president of the SC Home Economics Association, the York County Historical Society, the Catawba Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) and the S.D. Barron Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC). Neely died in 1984.

The Juanita H. Neely Papers consist of correspondence, autobiographical and biographical data, speeches, radio talks, clippings, photographs, and articles mainly relating to her work with the South Carolina Home Demonstration Extension Service. There is also family history material relating to the Neely family. This collection is a good source of information concerning the South Carolina Home Economics Extension program in the first half of the twentieth century. While the papers range from 1911 to about 1970, the more valuable and greater part of the collection extends from the mid-1920s to 1957, when Juanita Neely rose from a county home economics extension agent to the State Demonstration Agent. The collection contains many of her speeches, radio talks and articles made during this period; the reference material that she used for her speeches; letters of appreciation from agents and others upon her retirement; and materials relating to the Winthrop-Clemson controversy in 1955 concerning the location of the Home Economics Extension Program. There is also biographical material, award notices, and some correspondence dating after Juanita Neely’s retirement from the Home Economics Extension Program. Additional Neely information may be found by referring to the Winthrop Archives, record group 412, and the 1958-1959 edition of Who’s Who of American Women.

For more information about this collection please visit the online collection record and/or contact the Archives

Library Hours This Week

April 13, 2015 by

Dacus Library hours for the week of Monday, April 13th to Sunday, April 19th:

     Building Hours     Reference Hours
Mon. – Wed.      24 Hours
    9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
Thursday      24 Hours     9:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Friday      Closes at 7:00 PM     9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Saturday      12:00 PM to 7:00 PM     1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Sunday      Opens at 1:00 PM     1:00 PM to 9:00 PM

24 hour access to the library begins at 1:00 PM Sundays
and runs until 7:00 PM Fridays.
The Information Commons desk opens at 8:00 AM and closes at midnight during 24 hour access.
Only the main floor remains open after midnight.

View complete library schedule.

Don’t forget, you need a valid Winthrop ID card in order to access the library.

NATURALIST RUDY MANCKE TO SPEAK AT WINTHROP, SPONSORED BY FRIENDS GROUP

April 6, 2015 by

ManckeRudyRudy Mancke, a well-known Palmetto State naturalist, will talk about his environmental career on April 14 at Winthrop. Sponsored by the Friends of Dacus Library, the 6 p.m. event will be held at Dinkins Auditorium.

The Spartanburg, South Carolina native is best known for his long-running and award-winning ETV series “NatureScene.” Winthrop presented him an honorary degree in 1993 degree and he has since retired as Distinguished Lecturer in Natural History from the University of South Carolina’s School of the Environment in 2008. He continues to teach an S.C. natural history course for the university.

Mancke also is a former curator of natural history at the S.C. State Museum, director of science and nature programming at SC ETV, and founder of the S.C. Association of Naturalists.

His honors are numerous and have included:

  • South Carolina Environmental Awareness Award (1992)
  • Order of the Palmetto (1993)
  • Margaret Douglas Award of The Garden Club of America (1995)
  • South Carolina Hall of Science and Technology Inductee (1997)
  • Best Friend of Libraries (1998)
  • Lucy Hampton Bostick Award of Richland County Library (1999)
  • Charles H. Townes Award (2000)
  • S.C. Broadcasters Association Masters Award (2001)
  • William C. Everhart Award (2001)
  • Regional Director’s Conservation Award of US Fish and Wildlife Service (2003)

Mancke’s talk is eligible for Cultural Events and Global Learning Initiative credit for Winthrop students.  His presentation is free and open to the general public.

For more information, contact Ronnie W. Faulkner, faulknerr@winthrop.edu or 803/323-2262.

Library Hours This Week

April 6, 2015 by

Dacus Library hours for the week of Monday, April 6th to Sunday, April 12th:

     Building Hours     Reference Hours
Mon. – Wed.      24 Hours
    9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
Thursday      24 Hours     9:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Friday      Closes at 7:00 PM     9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Saturday      12:00 PM to 7:00 PM     1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Sunday      Opens at 1:00 PM     1:00 PM to 9:00 PM

24 hour access to the library begins at 1:00 PM Sundays
and runs until 7:00 PM Fridays.
The Information Commons desk opens at 8:00 AM and closes at midnight during 24 hour access.
Only the main floor remains open after midnight.

View complete library schedule.

Don’t forget, you need a valid Winthrop ID card in order to access the library.

Librarian Spotlight

April 1, 2015 by

This month’s librarian spotlight is on Dr. Ronnie Faulkner, Dacus Library’s Head of Technical Services and Development Officer.

FaulknerRW

Dr. Faulkner (Ronnie) has been working at Dacus Library for four-and-a-half years, but has been a librarian for thirty-six years. As Head of Technical Services he supervises the technical services staff, covering areas of cataloging, database management, and monographic, serials, and electronic acquisitions. In addition, he does research and preparation of grant proposals, is a liaison with the University Development Office, acts as liaison and Secretary-Treasurer of  the Friends of Dacus Library, compiles and edits the Friends of Dacus Library Newsletter and the library development newsletter, and teaches HMXP 102 classes.

Ronnie has a BS degree in History from Campbell College, a MA degree in History from East Carolina University, a Masters in Library Science degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a PhD in History from the University of South Carolina.

Outside of work, Ronnie is the Secretary of the Rotary Club of Rock Hill and has been a Rotarian for over thirty years. Below is a picture of him being presented as the Rotary Major Donor on Sept 11, 2014. He attends Northside Baptist Church in Rock Hill and his other interests include science fiction, history and political science.

FaulknerRotaryPresentation

As part of his library duties Ronnie teaches some of the bibliographic instruction classes, so if you would like to meet with him for a research consultation, he is happy to set up an appointment. Just send an email to faulknerr@winthrop.edu. You can also take a look at the Friends of Dacus Library page, the Friends of the Library newsletter, and the Dacus Developments newsletter.

Dacus Library has many wonderful librarians on staff who all teach library instruction classes, work various hours on the reference desk, and do collection development work. Each librarian also has other specialized responsibilities within the library. You can view all of our previous librarian spotlight posts here or check back at the beginning of the month for a new one!

Library Hours This Week

March 30, 2015 by

Dacus Library hours for the week of Monday, March 30th to Sunday, April 5th:

     Building Hours     Reference Hours
Mon. – Wed.      24 Hours
    9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
Thursday      24 Hours     9:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Friday      Closes at 7:00 PM     9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Saturday      12:00 PM to 7:00 PM     1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Sunday      Opens at 1:00 PM     1:00 PM to 9:00 PM

24 hour access to the library begins at 1:00 PM Sundays
and runs until 7:00 PM Fridays.
The Information Commons desk opens at 8:00 AM and closes at midnight during 24 hour access.
Only the main floor remains open after midnight.

View complete library schedule.

Don’t forget, you need a valid Winthrop ID card in order to access the library.

Library Hours This Week

March 23, 2015 by

Dacus Library hours for the week of Monday, March 23rd to Sunday, March 29th:

     Building Hours     Reference Hours
Mon. – Wed.      24 Hours
    9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
Thursday      24 Hours     9:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Friday      Closes at 7:00 PM     9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Saturday      12:00 PM to 7:00 PM     1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Sunday      Opens at 1:00 PM     1:00 PM to 9:00 PM

24 hour access to the library begins at 1:00 PM Sundays
and runs until 7:00 PM Fridays.
The Information Commons desk opens at 8:00 AM and closes at midnight during 24 hour access.
Only the main floor remains open after midnight.

View complete library schedule.

Don’t forget, you need a valid Winthrop ID card in order to access the library.

The Moving Finger…Blinks, and Having Blinked, Blinks On

March 18, 2015 by

At the end of February, amid the snow and the false alarms for snow and ice in the Palmetto State came the following headline: “Why Digital Natives Prefer Reading in Print—And Yes You Read that Right!”. No, it didn’t come from the pen of this author (though it could have) nor did it come from any number of those whom some wish to brand as Luddites: Nicholas Carr, Mark Bauerlein, or Sven Birkerts. Rather it came from Maryland reporter Michael S. Rosenwald and The Washington Post. The piece is eye-catching if for no other reason than it isn’t from the usual suspects!

What Rosenwald discovered is precisely what Carr or Birkets or Bauerlien or your faithful columnist has been saying for at least a decade: yes, online reading occurs, and many digital natives use if for a variety of reasons. But no one, including them, prefers online reading when trying to comprehend a difficult text.

It is as if Rosenwald is reading over Carr or Bauerlien’s shoulder. The students he interviews do not like online reading because it is distracting. They find online reading difficult because when they read an online text, 90% of the time they are also doing something else: checking email, checking in at a social network, or even playing a game. Rosenwald opens with a young man, 20, who simply prefers reading text because of the smell, the feel and even the silence of the text: it isn’t making sounds, ringing bells, or offering a rabbit hole in which to get lost, literally or figuratively. Further, online readers tend to skim, cannot fully comprehend what they are reading, and find that their minds really wander all over the place. Some even complain that the light in their eyes rather than over their shoulders is problematic.

Some of those interviewed said they would not even attempt a difficult text in electronic form. And who can blame them? Most anyone can scan a newspaper or even take on a Harry Potter book. But Tocqueville? Plato? Joyce? It simply cannot be done. Joyce underscores the print versus online problem in high relief. Perhaps no other author lends himself well to the online format of hyperlink hype than Joyce because he requires so much elaboration. “Met him pike hoses” isn’t going to resonate with many that Joyce is word-playing with metempsychosis. But readers find that even such quellenforschung is also better done in print than a myriad of distracting hyperlinks.

Of course, it isn’t that digital natives or anyone else refuse to read online. Many love the ability to define words (though they likely forget them immediately), or to do quick keyword searches. Some, though I admit to reading between the lines, also prefer being able to do searches in books they haven’t read for materials they may need for a paper. Science materials, too, tend to be online favorites.

So, what are we to make of all this? As I have written elsewhere, it’s part of the transition. In no way do I believe that this spells the end of online materials. Publishers, who in a print world, enjoyed Sardanapalian benefits, are trying to recapture those cash cows in bits and bytes but with little success. It isn’t so easy, but they’re discovering it is much cheaper to print an electronic book while dropping the price only marginally. Like online courses at war with classroom ones, online books are going to be cheaper and provide a greater return on investment. That ROI does not necessarily include what students are investing in, however. If eBook reading increased 200%, it would still have a way to go before it caught up with print reading if measured in terms of value received and retained.

What this means for libraries is obvious, isn’t it? We still have to collect and support both for the time being, in the same way that we have for years supported microfilm and bound periodical volumes. Microform reading only caught on when there was no other choice. I would find it surprising if eBooks end up in the same dustbin. Microform-reading was never easier, better or more convenient. Nothing about it enticed the reader, and much dissuaded even the diligent. Its only attraction was a pedestrian one: it saved spaced while still providing access, even if a difficult one. EBooks have already shown their value in the benefits mentioned above, but also in leisure reading. None of us really likes lugging suitcases of print books with us on vacation (my long-suffering wife will argue that she knows at least one person who does). Having the ability to take hundreds of etexts appeals to those of us with eyes larger than our brains.

But when it comes to scholarship that must be recalled and remembered, few of us will choose the electronic text over its printed counterpart. I believe this to be more a facility of evolution and practice rather than something inherently hard-wired in us. Unless or until we can rewire our brains and–for better or for worse, online reading is doing that—we will have to read both formats, depending on the subject matter and/or reason for reading.

I haven’t had time to sift through the new literacy report so I cannot speak to how well or to what extent the issue of online reading contributes to the strength or weakness of literacy. If the students in the Rosenwald story are right, and if my own research in this subject matter is at all correct, it may well unravel many of the gains we have made in literacy in recent decades. Poor readers, especially, will have a much tougher time going forward if they must learn to read digitally first. If that continues, we will see future generations underperforming when compared with their past peers.

And so, the print versus online debate continues in its ironies, whether you read this article first in print or online.

[A version of this piece appears in Against the Grain.]

Welcome Dan, Laura, Gavin and Elena!

March 17, 2015 by

Welcome Dan, Laura, Gavin and Elena!

Dacus looks forward to welcoming the Mahony family and working with Winthrop’s 11th president!

Library Hours This Week

March 16, 2015 by

Dacus Library hours for the week of Monday, March 16th to Sunday, March 22nd:

     Building Hours     Reference Hours
Mon. – Fri.      8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday     Opens at 5:00 PM
    5:00 PM to 9:00 PM

24 hour access will resume on Sunday, March 22nd at 5:00 PM.

View complete library schedule.

Don’t forget, you need a valid Winthrop ID card in order to access the library.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 343 other followers