Library Hours This Week

Dacus Library hours for the week of Monday, September 26th to Sunday, October 2nd:

Building Hours Commons Desk Hours
Mon. – Thurs. 24 Hours 8:00 AM to Midnight
Friday Closes at 7:00 PM 8:00 AM to 7:00 PM
Saturday 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Sunday Opens at 1:00 PM 1:00 PM to Midnight

The Information Commons desk opens at 8:00 AM and closes at midnight during 24 hour access. Only the main floor remains open after midnight.

View complete library schedule

Don’t forget, you need a valid Winthrop ID card in order to access the library.

Stand Up For Your Right To Read!

September 25th through October 1st is Banned Books Week this year (2016). Although the name might at first seem a little misleading or confusing, Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read – it is after all our first amendment right! This annual event focuses on efforts to restrict or remove books from schools and libraries, usually by parents who find the content to be offensive or inappropriate in some way. By focusing on these efforts, Banned Books Week is actually drawing attention to the harm of censorship in our communities.

If you’d like to learn more, visit the ALA page on Banned Books Week and look for more posts this week on Dacus Library’s Facebook and Twitter accounts. Also, drop by Dacus Library and check out a banned book – we have some displayed on the main floor. If you’re not sure where to find a particular book, whether it’s been challenged somewhere or not, just ask us at the Information Commons desk or search our catalog here.

Banned Books Week 2016

 

 

 

Dr. Gregg Hecimovich to Speak on N.C. Slave Narrative on October 3rd

The Friends of Dacus Library will hold their annual dinner meeting at 6 p.m., October 3, 2016, in Tuttle Dining Room, McBryde Hall. The speaker of the evening will be Dr. Gregg Hecimovich, who will speak on his forthcoming book, The Life and Times of Hannah Crafts: The True Story of The Bondwoman’s Narrative, slated for publication by Ecco/HarperCollins in 2018. Dr. Hecimovich is Professor and Chair in the Department of English at Winthrop University.

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In 2001, Henry Louis Gates Jr. of Harvard purchased a nineteenth century African American manuscript at auction titled “The Bondwoman’s Narrative.” Gates authenticated it, and then published it in 2002 to great fanfare. The work became an instant New York Times bestseller. But while Gates identified the author’s probable master, he did not locate the author. Hecimovich’s book identifies that first, black female novelist and tells her life story. At once a detective story, a literary chase, and a cultural history, The Life and Times of Hannah Crafts discovers a Dickensian tale of love, friendship, and betrayal against the backdrop of America’s slide into the Civil War.

Hecimovich’s research interests focus on the nineteenth century novel, slave narratives, technology and the humanities, and literary theory. He is the recipient of numerous teaching awards including the University of North Carolina Board of Governors Distinguished Professor for Teaching Award and the Max Ray Joyner Award for innovative teaching with technology.

Hecimovich, a Charlotte native, is author of a number of books and has spoken widely on his detective work that forms the basis for his forthcoming volume. Anyone interested in attending the October 3rd event who is not a member of the Friends of Dacus Library can do so by contacting Dr. Ronnie W. Faulkner at faulknerr@winthrop.edu or by calling 803/323-2262 by September 27th.  Tickets are $18. We hope you can make it!

Library Hours This Week

Dacus Library hours for the week of Monday, September 19th to Sunday, September 25th:

Building Hours Commons Desk Hours
Mon. – Thurs. 24 Hours 8:00 AM to Midnight
Tuesday 12:00 AM to 10:45 AM
12:15 PM to 11:59 PM
8:00 AM 10:45 AM
12:15 PM to 11:59 PM
Friday Closes at 7:00 PM 8:00 AM to 7:00 PM
Saturday 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Sunday Opens at 1:00 PM 1:00 PM to Midnight

The Information Commons desk opens at 8:00 AM and closes at midnight during 24 hour access. Only the main floor remains open after midnight.

View complete library schedule

Don’t forget, you need a valid Winthrop ID card in order to access the library.

Libraries 2016: Where Are We Now?

The Pew Report, just released, mainly concerns itself with public libraries.  But mention is made here simply to underscore what is true for all libraries.  One of the main takeaways from the Pew Report this year is that libraries are valued in their communities, but only if they are used.

Now surely this sounds painfully obvious, and perhaps it is, but the meaning I take from it is that if libraries remain hidden, remain quiet little platoons in their communities, they will eventually be overlooked and forgotten.  Those who have never used libraries, or used them very little, see little reason to be concerned when they close.  You really don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone.  I mention this point first because in Europe, libraries are vanishing as rapidly as snow on a hot tin roof.  I need not add that once they are gone, getting them back successfully falls along the lines of a Herculean labor.  All the more reason that libraries must develop a more ‘in your face attitude,’ as the is the common vernacular has it.

Other important findings center on what libraries should be offering.  Should they offer books, teach digital and literacy skills, provide access to eBooks and ejournals, make available comfortable collaborative spaces, and quiet reading areas?  Not only do the vast majority respond,” Yes,” it sounds more like Oliver Twist’s famous reply, “More, please.”

Sizable majorities have yet to come down on one side or the other about moving books out to make more room for other services.  Twenty-four percent support moving out the stacks to make more room for collaborative spaces, while 31% oppose the idea. Some 40% think libraries should at least consider the idea.  The result of this is a proverbial one for libraries:  you’re damned if you do and you’re damned if you don’t’.

A growing consensus is emerging about how librarians can help interpret information as well as find it.  Those surveyed also see a great value in libraries.  An overwhelming number of women see libraries as integral to their communities (proving once again how much smarter women are than men), while smaller and smaller numbers view the library’s community impact as negligible.

When you look at the results perhaps you can see why we at Dacus try to provide as much as we can in various modalities, as the philosophers might say.  We still offer print books, more than 450,000 of them.  We now offer a wide-ranging selection of eBooks, more than 150,000 of them.  We also offer laptops, iPads, and MacBooks.  Dacus also provides more than 100 PCs from which to work, as  well as nearly a  dozen Macs.  We’re open 24/5 during the school year, and now provide ways to stay fit and study for long periods of time.  These are just a few of the favorite things folks have told us they wanted.  Happily, we have them all, plus everything else mentioned in the Pew Report.

Libraries today are thriving, or attempting to, at a time when everyone wants something different.  We at Dacus try to provide all that in innovative ways, all the while still coloring within budgetary lines.  It’s never been an easy task, and users’ disparate needs make it harder than ever before.  But we aim to please, so let us know what else we can do to make your visit rise to, and even exceed, your expectations.